Mike DeVries  Discussion Board


machines rusting. Help!

Posted by vats from IP: 107.5.94.116 on 07/16/13
mi, usa

So every summer my machine rust. They are all cast iron.I keep the air on at the shop all summer and still Everytime I come back the next day they have rust build up on them. So I spend the first hour at work cleaning them up. Getting very time consuming. any suggestions to help keeping these bad boys from rusting would be great. Thanks.



 
Message Board Main Page
Replies:

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by j.g. from IP: 188.102.137.114 on 07/16/13

.

first of all:
you should analyse the reason for the excessive moisture in your shop.
so the "air on" solution might be the real circumstance causing the problem. air conditioners are very fishy contraptions. over here in europe they are not that wide spread like over ther in the united states. those i've seen over there are mostly rusty and dripping contraptions better called "germ breeding farms", which haven't been maintained one single time throughout their existence. i wonder how health authorities try to regulate everything to the tiniest bit related to anything which involves "open" human bodies and especially to tattooing without giving even one single thought to air conditioners.
so let's face the facts:
these shxt can cause more serious health problems than you ever could with tattooing without any of the usual precautions. yo'll be better off turning that shit off once and forever and get yourself a few good fans (and a good oven/heater for the winter) and open windows and doors as far as possible to cause a natural air flow in your shop. closing the windows/doors over night shouldn't increase humidity that far that the rust problem shouldn't turn up again- as least as long you don't live in the middle of some alligator swamp.
if the latter is the reason natural airflow ain't enough. you should get yourself some dehumidifiers and maintain them daily. you also should store your tools in a kind of a "reverse" cigar humidor- that means instead of a reservoir of water you should build a reservoir for that silicate granulate that comes in those small sacks with electronic equipment and other "moisture hating stuff" when shipped first. even plain rice should help a bit if the local humidity ain't to high level- you remember your mom always throwing some rice corns into the salt for keeping the salt corns in separation of each other?

and at last:
plain carbon steel always has a slight bit of a rust problem if you don't happen to live in the middle of the sahara/llano estacado/death valley. at least it should have a treatment like gun blueing, but it would be way better if you would take your tools apart and give the frame a solid coating, no matter if powder coat or acid resistant laquer. if there's a- with "iron" frames completely unnecessary- yoke, you should treat it like the frame. only the "moving iron parts" of the machines (coil cores, springs and a-bar) shouldn't get laquered, because the hitting impact will crush the laquer coating and will produce tiny splinters of laquer which you definitely don't want to have in an open wound...


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by Quest from IP: 97.102.70.230 on 07/17/13
FL

Are you using a cold sterilant or wipe on your frames? Try 3 in 1 oil and use a qtip to get in those hard to reach places. I always keep my coils slightly oiled to prevent oxidation. Hope this helps.


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by j.g. from IP: 94.222.226.73 on 07/18/13

.

in case of using an oil coating after breaking down the machines after work, you should wipe all the oil away and wipe down the machine completely with some desinfectant liquid before you start a new set up the next day, because the oil coating is a nice playground for germs and surely has been inviting a lot of nasty microbes for a nice party over night.

by the way:
always when i see a tattoo artist putting on his gloves (non sterile), taking a machine from the shelf (non sterile), opening disposal packages with needles/grip (non sterile), taking out the contents (sterile up to this point, but defifuckingnitely no second longer) and setting up tools, it makes me doubt that this person got a clue what he's doing. this plainly makes no sense at all and contaminates everything in a few seconds. and i see this quite often in videos and natural life...


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by Jhooks420 from IP: 71.82.13.84 on 07/23/13
Birmingham,Al.

Air conditioners remove moisture from the conditioned space. Thats why they have condensate drains which empty the water/moisture outside.


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by j.g. from IP: 92.78.16.139 on 07/25/13

.

not true, as there are a lot of different types of air conditionong systems and they work with rather different methods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_conditioning

normally the aren't dehumidifying at all- a lot of them keep a constant level of humidity of 40%-60%. evaporation systems even more.

btw.:
you should read the part about health issues. very interesting...


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by Jhooks420 from IP: 71.82.13.84 on 07/25/13
Birmingham,Al.

Believe what u want to believe. I went to school for HVAC and have been in the HVAC industry for 15 years. Here in the USA air conditioners remove moisture from the conditioned space. The refrigerant removes heat and moisture from the space and displaces it outside. Its a hard concept for some people to grasp apparently, but I promise you that is what happens.If you live in a high humidity area then you may need to add a dehumidifier to remove 100% of the humidity from your shop. Wikipedia can be written by anyone. Go to Trane or Carriers site, or any HVAC site and tell them that AC's don't remove moisture.. The engineers and scientists there will enjoy you.


top of page

RE:machines rusting. Help!

Posted by Bobby "G" from IP: 68.202.151.90 on 07/25/13
Daytona Beach, Florida

Hey Bud,

I live in Florida and find the same problem sometimes depending on the humidity levels here. Try getting a few zip lock backs and before you leave each night take each machines you use the most and individually bag them up. Make sure you wipe each one down with a dry rag or paper towel so no moisture is on them then set the machine in the bag let all the air out then zip it up. This will help keep the humidity from getting to them and they should should stop the rusting for you. just make sure you wipe them down other wise the moisture will get trapped in the bag and you will have the same problem all over again. Hope this helps


top of page

 
Message Board Main Page