9545 Reseda Blvd. unit 2, Northridge, CA (818) 700-2818
Archive Page: First 60 61 62 63 64 65 Last
New Thread

Threads:

Archive Page: First 60 61 62 63 64 65 Last

How to know your magnums?

Hi, I am wondering if anyone has any advice on using magnums, and knowing which ones are best for different types of tattoo's. Unfortunately when I was trained, my mentor was never taught to use them and so she didnt (and therefore did not pass that on to me), until recently. With so many varieties, I find it hard to know what each one is designed for. I mostly use either standard M1 mags, or curved mags, and I really love the curved mags, but I dont know if they are fine to use on every piece. There are also flat mags and M2 (double stacked mags) and I would love any assistance in this area. (For eg, double stack are best for solid tribal, curved for portraits etc.)
Also do you use the flats and double stacks in the same way that you use the others, as I have heard from some people that they chop the skin a lot easier. To me this seems it would come from either inexperience or incorrect use. Unfortunately I have found there is so little support and advice for artists who have entered the industry properly and are doing all the right things and are simply trying to broaden their horizons and move with the times.

It makes me feel a little unprofessional to even ask for advice on a forum about something that I should clearly already know, but I really just want to be the best artist I can be and give each client the best tattoo possible, so I shall swallow my pride and hope that someone out there can shed a little light on this for me.

Most appreciated.


Replies:

RE:How to know your magnums?

I have to say that I find it odd that you do not have tattoo artist friends that could answer this question very easily... You work in a full custom studio, and no one uses mags?! Not trying to bash you, just confused.
top of page

RE:How to know your magnums?

We do use mags now (there are only the two of us in the studio, me and my mentor) and we have been using them for well over four years, but I am hesitant to branch out without knowing what the use for each tyoe of magnum is. Until recently we only used M1 mags, but tried curved mags and fell in love with them.

I know that I can continue on with trial and error, but simply assumed that they must have been designed for individual purposes and am trying to understand what those purposes are. The most standard response I have recieved when enquiring about their use has been "it just depends on the piece you are doing"....which doesnt help me all that much.

Yes, we do have some tattooist friends that we could ask, but as I stated before, it is quite evident that we missed the boat in this department and quite frankly a little embarrassing to even ask. At least this is slightly more anonymous.

Please understand, we ARE using magnums and have been for quite some time, I just feel limited as I do not understand what magnum is best for what piece in terms of m1, m2, curved or flat.

I appreciate your concerns as I understand how it looks and I would neer give out information to someone either outside the industry or trying to enter the industry, but it simply is what it is, hence the reason why trying to get the right information has been so difficult.

Any help is appreciated, thank you.
top of page

RE:How to know your magnums?

On the subject of the double stacked mags,I've been using them for about 8 years now and have had no problem with them packing in color or black and grey.My machine technique is kinda like Joshua Carlton in the way there set up.Actually I never use a 7 or 9 mag always a 13 or 15 doublestack mag instead when I use those size tubes unless its a bugpin piece.Ive seen my work hold up for years with good quality results using them.
top of page

RE:How to know your magnums?

Trial and error is probably the best way to find out which groups work best for you. Some say standard mags are best for black and grey and curved for solid color. Others are just the opposite. Some people use standard for smaller mags and curved for larger mags.Personally, I use curved groups almost exclusively. If you're not stuck on mags and you can make your own needles, try making some curved flat groups; such as 7,9,11 curved flats. These groups are easier to use than regular flats as far as they don't chop the skin as you mentioned, and it is easier to get a flat in to tight spaces than a mag. It is also easier to get soft shading than mags because the holes being poked in the skin are closer together.Proof of this fact is that more and more artists are using very fast shader machines and smaller diameter needles or bug pins. Both of these things make holes closer together. You can also make stacks this way or M2 mags as they are sometimes called.It seems to work best to use long taper needles for these groups. You can also use bugpins to make the group even closer but like mags the number of needles will increase as the width of the group increases e.g.7 flat is now 8 flat 13 is now 15 with .30 #10 bugpins. I haven't tried this with .25 #08 pins yet but the .30 work really well.
top of page

RE:How to know your magnums?

Thanks for the info guys. I was just wondering whether I was holding myself back by not using flats and double stacks, whether I should move with the times a little. But I really wasnt sure why or when or how to use them. I manage to easily get through all of my tattoo's using either standard mags or curved mags (lurve my curved mags) but I always wondered why the other types of needles existed if it wasnt going to improve some particular area of tattooing, or have a specific use. I might try them out on myself and see if I like the movement, but I am also content with using the mags I enjoy. Just wanted to make sure I was disadvantaging myself or my clients for not using the other types.
top of page